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Endesa - Electricity, Gas, People

How many euros does it cost to take a shower?

Published on May 6, 2019

How much does each shower cost? What expenses do you generate by using the microwave? Your life revolves around simple activities in which you consume energy—and they all have an impact on your wallet.

Your routine is built by stringing together an endless list of small actions that you do practically with your eyes closed. You wake up, use the bathroom, eat, wash your clothes...even just to relax, you need to do something.

It seems like you’re not spending anything during these situations. You aren’t in a store, you don't see any salespeople, nor do you clearly identify any product. Lastly and most importantly, you don’t see the price. However, in reality, most of these activities cost money.

How much money? It’s not easy to calculate, because it depends on many factors, including the price you're paying for energy.

We’ve tried to roughly calculate what your daily routine costs. To make all of these estimations, we’ve taken a series of average costs and included the electricity tax, customised equipment rental and VAT (21%). However, this price will depend on the tariff you have chosen.

One shower, 15 cents

If you have an electric heater, one 10-minute shower will cost around 0.15 euros. As a reference, we’ve taken the average power (4.4 kW) for these types of heaters.

However, each time you shower, you don't need to think about how much you're spending. In reality, you're saving, because one shower is cheaper (and more eco-friendly) than filling up the bathtub.

Remember to regulate the temperature of the water between 30ºC and 35ºC to find the perfect balance between a pleasant water temperature and a bill that is under control.

Drying your hair, 2 cents

If styling your hair is expensive (just ask bald people), blame your hairdresser or the price of shampoo, because keeping it dry is one of the cheapest routines in your daily life.

If we take 15 minutes to dry our hair using a medium-low power dryer (2.2 kW), we’ll spend around 0.02 euros on electricity.

Shaving your beard: 13 cents

One 10-minute shave with a 4 kW electric razor will cost you approximately 0.13 euros.

If you shave with a non-electric razor, the price is a total mystery, given that it totally depends on how much time you take, whether or not you always have the tap running, and especially how hot you need the water.

One daily shower of around 15 minutes costs you around 1 euro per week if you have an electric heater.

Watching your favourite television series: 13 cents

You have a 40’ LED television and your series lasts 50 minutes. Do you know how much it costs to watch your favourite series? 0.13 euros.

We remind you that having the television on standby also consumes electricity. In addition, having a centralised power strip for the television and other small associated home appliances (decoder, speakers, etc.) makes your life a lot easier in terms of turning them off and avoiding phantom consumption.

Doing laundry: 40 cents

The cost of washing clothes depends enormously on the wash cycle you choose. But if we take as a reference a 2 kW washing machine and an eco-friendly programme that lasts 1 hour, the estimated cost of doing laundry is 0.40 euros.

The higher the temperature of the water, the more the consumption will be. In fact, heating the water is the function that consumes the most energy in the wash cycle (around 85%). Spinning is also a significant extra electricity cost. Taking this information into account, it will come as no surprise that the washing machine is the third-most consuming home appliance. Almost all Spanish homes have one, and it is normally used 3-5 times per week.

To save on this line entry of expenses, we recommend that you use a washing machine with the most efficient energy label on the market. Loading the washing machine as full as possible is also recommended, that is, fill the basin with as many clothes that will fit inside. If you don't have sufficient dirty clothes, opt for a medium load programme.

We also advise you to use all of the programmes that you can with cold water, unless the clothes are especially dirty.

Washing the dishes: 50 cents

In this case, we chose a 2 kW dishwasher. Like with the washing machine, the water temperature (90% of the consumption goes toward heating it) and the duration of the programme are the decisive factors to estimate the cost on your bill.

Choosing a responsible, eco-friendly programme of 1 hour and 15 minutes would cost €0.50 on your bill.

There are studies that question the efficiency of this home appliance, given that in some cases, it is cheaper to wash the dishes by hand. However, dishwashers with the most energy efficient labels do involve savings compared to washing by hand.

We have 3 pieces of advice for each time you use the dishwasher:

  • If before turning it on, you want to remove leftover food in the sink, use cold water.
  • Turn it on only when you’ve filled it with plates, cups, cutlery, etc.
  • Always choose eco-friendly programmes or those with a lower temperature.

If you use the dishwasher twice per day, you're losing 7 euros per week to clean the dishes.

One roast chicken: 51 cents

In a medium-sized 1.7 kW electrical oven, preheat for 15 minutes, as recommended by the best chefs, and then cooking a nice golden chicken for 1 hour and 15 minutes costs a total of 0.51 euros.

While the chicken is cooked, we provide you with some recommendations to claw back a few cents on your menu:

  • Choose an oven with the most efficient energy label./li>
  • Don’t open the door while baking..
  • Take advantage of the of heat and add more foods so that they cook at the same time (how about baked apples and potatoes to accompany the chicken?).
  • Turn off your oven ahead of time, because your food will finish cooking with the residual heat.

Cooking lentils in your fast-cooker: 20 cents

A good dish with legumes has a cooking time in the fast-cooker of around 50 minutes. If you use a 1.2 kW glass ceramic heater, it will cost 0.20 euros.

Take into account that cooking batteries with a thick diffuser optimise the distribution of heat and increase efficiency. In addition, covering pots, pans and saucepans keeps in the heat.

Heating water for tea in the microwave: 10 cents

Opening your microwave, inserting a cup with water and heating it for two minutes will cost you 0.10 euros.

As it turns out, using the microwave oven instead of the conventional oven represents an energy saving of between 60 and 70%. Look for a recipe for the microwave and try it out.

How to make your daily routine free

As we said, all of these calculations mean nothing if you have a very expensive or inexpensive tariff. What if you have a tariff with free hours?

There are tariffs that allow you to choose hours in which you pay 0 euros for each kWh consumed. Imagine being able to choose the hours in which you’re showering, watching your favourite TV series, using the washing machine...If you think about it, you tend to concentrate those activities during certain times of the day or week.

Endesa’s Happy Tempo Tariff offers you 3 ways so that your daily life is invisible on your bill:

  • 1. Choose two consecutive hours everyday.
  • 2. Choose one day per week.
  • 3. Choose the 50 hours of greatest consumption per month.

Whichever Happy option you choose, during those periods your electricity consumption will not cost you anything.